Panda Story

""I say the apostrophe is tireless because it does so many jobs, poor thing. It started out with just one simple function: to show where letters had been left out. Up above, there is an apostrophe in the word that’s. It helps us see the shortened version of “that is.” The title of the book has the shortened version of “the girl is.” But the apostrophe also has another job. It does its best to show when something is owned by someone or a group of people. Whenever something is owned by one person, an apostrophe appears magically before the s. So my brother’s book is “the book owned by my brother”! When the thing is owned by many people, the apostrophe comes after the s, so my friends’ birthdays means “the birthdays of a bunch of my friends”! If it sounds complicated, don’t blame the apostrophe. Blame the people who didn’t come up with different marks for the different jobs. They were very, very shortsighted.""

-LYNNE TRUSS



Panda Story

"Punctuation marks are the traffic signals of language: they tell us to slow down, notice this, take a detour, or stop. Of all the punctuation marks, the comma is the most used and misused. Commas can create havoc when they are left out or are put in the wrong spot, and the results of misuse can be hilarious. This little dot with a tail has the power to change the meaning of a sentence by connecting things that shouldn’t be connected or breaking apart things that should stay together. So enjoy laughing at some of the ways commas can change everything!"

-LYNNE TRUSS

Panda Story

A panda walks into the library. He eats a sandwich, then draws his bow and shoots two arrows out the window. “Why did you do that?” asks the librarian as the panda walks toward the exit. The panda shows her a badly punctuated book. “I’m a panda,” he says. “That’s what it says we do.”